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Andrew Heumann is an artist, technologist, and architectural designer based in New York City. As a senior researcher at WeWork, he develops new software tools and workflows for design and architecture teams. Formerly a design technology specialist at Woods Bagot and at NBBJ, he has written more than 20 plug-ins for 3D-modeling software (“Human” — the most popular — has had over 50,000 downloads) and created many bespoke tools for design teams and practices that aid in the management of project metrics, environmental and urban analysis, and façade design. Outside of his professional work, Andrew is a generative artist, working with data, algorithms, geometry, and pixels to create rich visual abstractions that engage and challenge the limits and affordances of digital media. Andrew has studied both architecture and computer science, and has lectured and taught seminars at Cornell University, Yale University, Columbia GSAPP, and the California College of the Arts. His work has been published in Wallpaper* magazine, the International Journal of Architectural Computing, and CLOG journal, and presented at conferences including ACADIA, SIMAUD, Autodesk University, and the AEC Technology Symposium.

andrew heumann


Andrew Heumann is an artist, technologist, and architectural designer based in New York City. As a senior researcher at WeWork, he develops new software tools and workflows for design and architecture teams. Formerly a design technology specialist at Woods Bagot and at NBBJ, he has written more than 20 plug-ins for 3D-modeling software (“Human” — the most popular — has had over 50,000 downloads) and created many bespoke tools for design teams and practices that aid in the management of project metrics, environmental and urban analysis, and façade design. Outside of his professional work, Andrew is a generative artist, working with data, algorithms, geometry, and pixels to create rich visual abstractions that engage and challenge the limits and affordances of digital media. Andrew has studied both architecture and computer science, and has lectured and taught seminars at Cornell University, Yale University, Columbia GSAPP, and the California College of the Arts. His work has been published in Wallpaper* magazine, the International Journal of Architectural Computing, and CLOG journal, and presented at conferences including ACADIA, SIMAUD, Autodesk University, and the AEC Technology Symposium.


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